OUR WOOD HERITAGE

  • January 10, 2019
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15th Jan is the deadline of the 2018 photo contests dedicated to World Wood Day. The contest categories are Heritage, Environment & People. The date is coming soon so we decided to give you some inspiration by showing you last year in which category was registered the grand prize of $2500 winning photo, the winner of that category grabbing $1800 and  the 10 honorable mentions with the $300.

So last year the category in which the winning photo was registered was ‘Heritage’. See the photos below, what authors said about them and join in here https://www.voubs.com/contests/change-in-wood-culture-heritage/654  

 

Heritage category, Honorable mentions:

  1. “Bayanihan Spirit” by Raniel Castañeda (Philippines)

 

 

Bayanihan is a core essence of the Filipino culture. It is helping out one’s neighbor as a community, and doing a task together, thus lessening the workload and making the job easier. It is also called the ‘community spirit’. It is best exhibited when people wish to move locations in the rural area. The traditional Filipino house, the ‘bahay-kubo’, can be moved using wooden poles which are carried from the old place to the new one. This requires a group of people to lift and carry the house on their shoulders. Able-bodied men usually participated in such feats, while women stood and watched, casually chatting and cheering the men on. Afterwards, there will be a small gathering as a form of celebration and socialization.

  1. “Embracing Culture” by Aveek Bhowmik (India)

 

 

Devotional fervour sweeps the temple town of Puri in Odisha, India, in the run-up to the famous Jagannath Rath Yatra or car festival, held around July. Artisans begin work on the wooden chariots of the three divine siblings —Jagannath, Subhadra and Balabhadra — in April with logs of wood piled on the road leading to the Jagannath temple. Around 13,000 cubic feet of wood goes into making the three colossal cars. The artisans build the chariots through sheer expertise and accuracy of measurements they’ve learnt from their forefathers. The entire locality is dotted with carpenters, artisans and tailors giving shape to the divine juggernaut that will carry the lord as he comes out of his abode to greet the devout. Though it’s a daunting task, they defy rain and shine. Their perseverant hands and pious hearts keep going, proving that they are a small cog in the large wheel.

  1. “Mosque” by Şaban Ok (Turkey)

 

 

This is a very old mosque. There is only one imam inside right now. People will come to pray. But there are few people in the village.There is little light here. Because winter is very hard. The window is small.

  1. “U Bein Bridge, Myanmar” Sirsendu Gayen (India)

Situated 11 kilometres south of Mandalay, the unique U Bein Bridge is a beautiful 1.2 kilometre-long structure built from teak planks and said to be the longest of its type in the world. In 1857, when the capital moved from nearby Amarapura to Mandalay, the local mayor (named U Bein) salvaged wood from pieces of the dismantled teak palace and reconstructed it into this magnificent bridge.

 

  1. “Hand Carving” by Faustino Carmona Guerrero (Spain)

 

 

Visiting the work place of a carpentry craftsman, using his work tools to shape the wood. Spheres that are gradually lost.

  1. “Paete” by Carlo Zamora (Philippines)

 

 

In Paete, Laguna, Philippines Wood Sculpture is their main Business, this is their heritage. They use "PAET" it means chisel for their wood carving and they do mostly religious figures.

  1. “Traditional Wooden Boats” by Azim Khan Ronnie  (Bangladesh)

 

 

Hundreds of wooden boats are arranged in flower shapes, ready to carry workers from the outskirts to their jobs in the centre of the city. The enormous groups of boats in the Bangladeshi capital of Dhaka, which is the third most densely populated city in the world - home to 17 million people. The pictures were taken in the Sadarghat area, on the banks of the Buriganga river, which is used as a route into Dhaka city for millions of workers. The boats were clustered in groups, with between 20 and 200 vessels in each of the groups.

  1. “A Religious Site” by Christian Aleta (Philippines)

 

 

Philippines is known as one of the biggest Catholic country in Asia. With their strong religious affiliation with Catholicism, wooden statues can be seen in all of the houses. Here in Paete, Laguna, Philippines, this husband and wife creates wooden status of Mary, and other Catholic Saints and sell them to their partners, locally and abroad.

  1. “The Master of the Tree” by Ivo Ivanov  (Bulgaria)

 

 

The photo is from an event, a revival of a Roman carpenter. It was made in Bulgaria, Pleven region, where during the Roman Empire there was a Roman garrison. He was responsible for the supply of tailors, carpenters and weapons smiths. The photo was taken in 2015.

  1. “Making of Wooden Boat” by Debasish Chakraborty (India)

 

 

Traditional wooden boat making of Bengal starts from 17th century. Till today Sripur near Balaragh of Bengal is famous for the wooden boat making and easy use for water transport, waning profits and a general disinterest on part of the new generation in this very specialised craft is bleeding the boatbuilders of Balagarh.

OVERALL CATEGORY WINNER:

“Reminiscing Traditional Wooden Boat” by Ferdous Shabbir(Bangladesh)

 


 

A former boat man reminiscing his love standing on the wreak. traditional wooden boats are rapidly disappearing and becoming a thing of the past because of metal boats. Once loved and glorious, this is a picture of the remaining hull of a traditional wooden schooner waiting to be weathered out.

GRAND PRIZE WINNER:

“Melody for Means” by Somenath Mukhopadhyay (India)

 

 

An old tribal man is playing an age-old stringed instrument made of wood and his grandson is listening to the melody. Shot at Birbhum, West Bengal in India.

 

 

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